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Thread: Maintenance: Ask the Expert

  1. #1
    acfawcett is offline Junior Member
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    Default Maintenance: Ask the Expert

    Hello everyone,

    My name is Andy Fawcett and I am starting this Ask the Maintenance Expert thread to answer questions you may have about facility renovation, repair, hardware selection, maintenance and similar topics.

    I do a bit of running around, so I may not get to stuff on the same day it was posted, but I’ll drop in at least a couple times a week if there is enough user interest.

    Some of your questions, and my answers, may appear in Inside Self Storage magazine as part of an Ask the Maintenance Expert column.

    In case you are wondering what makes me 'the expert' here's a quick rundown.

    I am the President of Accent Building Restoration (aka ABR or ABR USA). We provide self storage facilities with a full range of property and building services including cosmetic construction, roll door installation and repairs, upgrades, painting, specialty coatings, maintenance, access control and more. We've been at it for 17 years and have worked on thousands of facilities across the country during that time.

    Please note that neither I, nor Accent Building Restoration, Inc (aka ABR or ABR USA), assumes any liability for use of any information provided here. You are ultimately responsible for knowing the laws, knowing when you should seek professional help, observing any licensing or safety requirements and making all decisions related to your business.

    So that's it. Ask me your pressing questions and I'll do my best to give you a useful answer if it is something we have experience doing. On the off chance it is something we haven’t done I may still be able to provide some useful insight by virtue of the many types of problems we have be asked to solve over the years.

    All the best,

    Andy Fawcett
    abrusa.com

  2. #2
    Gina6k's Avatar
    Gina6k is offline Moderator
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    Default re: Maintenance: Ask the Expert

    Hi Andy, welcome to the group!

    There is one nagging question I haven't found a great answer for just yet. In regards to the insulation that is above the red iron & below the roof inside metal storage buildings; where do we get supplies and what is the best method for attempting to replace dried out sections?

    What we have is insulation with white on the plastic sheeting side of it and we have seen it start to dry & crack where the sunlight comes through our door transoms and sky lights. The runs of the insulation are really long, but I don't know how, other than to cut into in sections and use white duct tape how to patch it.

    I'd like a nicer appearing, cleaner solution. Where do you cut away and is there any better product than the duct tape as it loses it's stickiness and sometimes won't adhere to the older insulation.

    Thanks for any suggestions!
    Gina 6k
    CochraneStorage dot com
    Morgan Hill, California
    twitter.com/CochraneStorage

    You only live once, but if you do it right, once is enough!
    I am not an attorney, just an experienced manager who is willing to share what I have learned. Your thoughts, practices or opinions may vary and neither of us may be right.

  3. #3
    acfawcett is offline Junior Member
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    Default re: Maintenance: Ask the Expert

    I think I can give some help on this, although not perfect solutions, it is much better than duct tape.

    Before going into the fixes, let me first explain one of the things that make repairs or replacement of this material especially difficult. In most cases this vinyl covered insulation is installed when the building is being built, prior to when the interior space walls are erected. So when the partition walls are built they trap the insulation between the top of the wall and the ceiling. This is done on purpose as a way to more thoroughly secure the insulation to the ceiling. Obviously the designers were not concerned with the maintenance of the insulation at a later date.

    So the only way to remove parts of the insulation is to cut along the edge of the unit walls where it is trapped against the ceiling. But when reinstalling new material it is hard to find a method to secure it to the ceiling.

    Therefore the best option for doing repairs if the actual insulation is intact and not water saturated is to re-skin it with new white vinyl sheeting that matches the original.

    The material is referred to as a Polypropylene Polyester scrim. One manufacturer is Lamtec Corporation, product #WMP-VR-R plus perforated. If you go to lamtec.com you can get a data sheet on it

    The tape you use to secure it to the existing insulation is # 1537WMP-VR metal building facing tape. It is made by Venture Tape. You can see the data-page at: venturetape.com
    This tape can be used to repair tears, re-secure the scrim to the ceiling, cover seams when patches are done, etc.

    Let me say that I have no affiliation with either of these companies, and other similar materials may be available. These are just the ones I knew of right off the bat.

    Andy Fawcett
    abrusa.com

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    Gina6k's Avatar
    Gina6k is offline Moderator
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    Default re: Maintenance: Ask the Expert

    Andy, you described exactly the problem I was facing. Sure I can cut, but how the heck to secure it. Yes, all of the insulation is held in place just as you described.

    Thank you for the product links and the solution! At least now we have a way to tackle this and a couple of product resources. I'll check with a couple of local supply houses now that I know what to ask for.

    Hopefully I'll remember to do before & after photos to share with everyone here when we get it done. Thank you so very much Andy!!!
    Gina 6k
    CochraneStorage dot com
    Morgan Hill, California
    twitter.com/CochraneStorage

    You only live once, but if you do it right, once is enough!
    I am not an attorney, just an experienced manager who is willing to share what I have learned. Your thoughts, practices or opinions may vary and neither of us may be right.

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    Default re: Maintenance: Ask the Expert

    Here's one that has bothered me for years, maybe you can help...

    On my indoor second story hallway, we originally put down a latex poured decking material over the plywood floor. Just in the corridor, not in the units. It's a flexible material that they spread and then broadcast silica or sand over to give it a traction component. Looked great for quite awhile and is very durable. Now it is terribly dirty and nearly impossible to clean, due to the rough surface. I have dragged a hose up there and scrubbed with non-sudsing dishwashing detergent and then followed immediately with a wet/dry vac to remove the water. It is a 3 man job, one on the scrub brush, one on the vac and a third on a floor squeegee trying to control where the water goes. I'm done with it.

    So, what do you recommend to replace it with? Something would have to go over it, not breakable and slippery tile, not filthy and stainable carpet, not hardwood, not linoleum that tears.... I've been at a loss to figure out what the next step is. If I could retrofit the floor with some drains, I would do that and just continued to scrub and hose, but tearing up the floor to install slope and a short drain line between the floors is not in the cards. I'm concerned that I wouldn't be able to get the existing surface clean enough for the next product to adhere to.

    Any ideas?
    In no way affiliated with Storman software.

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    Handyman's Avatar
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    Default re: Maintenance: Ask the Expert

    What repair parts for you feel its best to keep in inventory and the quanity of each per 100 units?

  7. #7
    acfawcett is offline Junior Member
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    Default re: Maintenance: Ask the Expert

    Quote Originally Posted by Storman View Post
    Here's one that has bothered me for years, maybe you can help...

    On my indoor second story hallway, we originally put down a latex poured decking material over the plywood floor. Just in the corridor, not in the units. It's a flexible material that they spread and then broadcast silica or sand over to give it a traction component. Looked great for quite awhile and is very durable. Now it is terribly dirty and nearly impossible to clean, ...Any ideas?
    @Storman

    As you surmised the reason your floor is currently so hard to keep clean is the non-slip aggregate they broadcast on the floor which causes the floor to be rough and porous, and tends to absorb dirt into it. You have probably "shredded" a few mops trying to clean it.

    Since you said it has a sand broadcast for non slip purposes I'm assuming it is not a rubberized coating as they generally do not require a non-slip additive. Does the surface have a rubber type give when pushing your fingernail into it and can the surface easily sliced into with a blade?

    If not and it is firm to the touch, and does not easily dent (hence not likely to be a rubberized coating) then the easiest least expensive and probably best solution is to simply recoat the floor with a high-build epoxy floor coating. Most of them have enough flex to accommodate a wood floor. If you use the proper one it will give you a new, fresh appearance that will be much easier to clean and maintain than the existing surface. (If you are still unsure of the type of surface you will need to do an adhesion and compatibility test before proceeding to the next step by painting a sample of the paint on the floor and testing for adhesion a few days later).

    If the existing coating is sound, meaning not peeling or delaminating, then what you can do is "seal" the floor with a coating designed specifically for floors thereby making it less rough and porous and more cleanable. If your floor is as rough as you say this should not affect anti-slip properties of the floor.

    Depending on the coarseness of the non-slip sand, it might be as simply as applying a couple of coats of an epoxy floor paint. If it is really coarse you might need to put down a high-build primer prior to applying the finish coats to get additional "fill".

    Because it is in the interior of a building I don't recommend a solvent based coating because of fumes, flammability, and dry time.

    A two part water based epoxy will do the trick fine. Don't use a one part product, even if it says epoxy on it. They are just not the same.

    A common product used is made by Devoe industrial coatings, distributed by ICI-Glidden. It is called "Tru-Glaze WB" #4208 gloss finish. 2 heavy coats will be sufficient on most floors. If it is really coarse apply 1 or 2 coats of their hi-build epoxy primer 1st. Most of your national paint manufactures will also have a comparable product to this. Have them cross reference this product and ask for recommendations. Again, just make sure it is a two part epoxy made for floors.

    After this you will probably need a maintenance coat every 4 or 5 years to keep it up. Another benefit to this route is you can choose a new color if you like.

    For a cost estimator, each coat of epoxy, applied at 300 sq ft per gallon, will coat you about 15 cents per sq ft in materials. So to paint a hallway that is 5 x100 = 500 sq ft x $ 0.15 = $75.00 material cost per coat. You will have to figure labor.

    If it is a rubberized coating that, let me know and I can give you other options, albeit more expensive.

  8. #8
    acfawcett is offline Junior Member
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    Default re: Maintenance: Ask the Expert

    Quote Originally Posted by Handyman View Post
    What repair parts for you feel its best to keep in inventory and the quanity of each per 100 units?
    @Handyman

    This is a difficult question without a little more information

    Is it at a single facility or do you service multiple facilities of different types (drive ups, multi-story, combos, etc.). How old and what kind of condition is it/are they in?

    What type of handyman work are you doing? Drywall repairs, hasp replacement/repairs, roll door springs, roll door replacements, plumbing, electrical including ballast and light bulbs, mechanical service, gates and security, etc? Does it include janitorial and landscaping?

    Answer these questions, do a survey of what type of fixtures/hardware/equipment you are dealing with and I'm sure I can help you with a few suggestions.

 

 
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