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  • 125 pounds per sq foot

    I'm reading that the minimum limit for multi-story buildings are usually 125 pounds per square foot.

    If I have a multi-story building that I'm looking at converting, how do I go about testing the 2nd and 3rd floors to make sure that they are up to spec?

    Thanks for your help,

    Okie_Pilot

  • #2
    Hire a local engineering firm to do it. This is not something you can do on your own.

    You'll often need to have a professional architect or engineer help with some of the planning and remodeling (such as creating "as-built" drawings to serve as a starting point for your conversion layout). Ideally, having one firm provide all of this service will make things less complicated.

    Steve

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    • #3
      Spot on, Steve. BTW, I have had cost estimates for the borings and reports (including x-ray of concrete) and requirements/drawings to meet the 125 PSF for around $80,000 for a three story 90,000 SF building. If you go to the engineering standards, you may be shocked at live load requirements. The cost to bring up to 125 PSF can be astounding.

      REF: http://faculty.arch.tamu.edu/media/c...1codeloads.pdf

      RK
      Live Well, Learn Lots, Love ALL!
      RK Kliebenstein
      Vice President of Business Development
      Metro Storage LLC
      847 387-2943
      rk@metrostorage.com
      E: rk@metrostorage.com
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