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  • Elevators

    Hey guys and gals,

    Still doing my due diligence and research on a conversion here in my town. The elevator that is currently in the building I am looking at is OLD. Like, wood beams and pulleys old.... So it would definitely need to be updated.

    I'm also kinda worried about the elevator shaft itself since it isn't concrete, but the old wood and plaster from what i can see. I'm not sure if that would be acceptable or not to place a new elevator in.

    For those of you that have elevators or have built a facility that uses elevators can you give me your advice, opinions, and suggestions. Such as what elevator company you chose and why. The popular names that I know of are Kone, Schindler, and Otis.

    If you don't mind, the ball park figure for the cost of the elevator.

    Do you have re-occurring monthly costs? Do you enroll in a maintenance type plan when you purchase the elevator? What happens when the elevator is down for mechanical issues? Is it warrantied for a certain amount of time or are you paying out the rear to have somebody come out every time to look at it?

    My plan was to convert the first floor of the facility before converting the second and third floors and investing a large amount of money in an elevator and building supplies

    Do elevator companies offer a financing option?

    I know Storman mentioned he paid $40,000 for his elevator, but I've also seen older quotes on the web that said anywhere between $60,000 - $120,000.

    Thanks for the help everybody!

    - Okie_Pilot

  • #2
    Get an architect to come and look at it-- structural integrity is something to be worried about if the elevator is that old. Ran a facility before with 2 elevators and having a maintenance program set up for it is key, but make sure some repairs are covered otherwise they'll charge you an arm and a leg because they can.

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    • #3
      Elevators are typically built with fire rated enclosures and a pit underneath, plus they usually stick out of the top of the building a bit. You'll want to research what you have for space above and below, and what new units require. I'd start with a all to the local elevator vendor who might be able to give you as much free education as possible, then I would expect that yes a local professional engineer is in your future.

      Steve

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      • #4
        One of the things I have heard about elevator problems is getting a too light duty elevator that cannot handle the kind of loads that these tenants will try to put on them, even if a weight limit sign/warning is posted. The tenant doesn't care about that. They load it to the max when they can. So I guess in essence I am saying, plan on a bit of overkill for the weight/load limit.
        "Never let the inmates run the asylum!"

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        • #5
          Also, if you have an access control system, plan ahead on if and how you want to integrate it into the elevator. Do you want a keypad inside or outside? Floor Control or Call Button control? Your access system provider would be able to help you with this.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Steve_hajewski View Post
            Elevators are typically built with fire rated enclosures and a pit underneath, plus they usually stick out of the top of the building a bit. You'll want to research what you have for space above and below, and what new units require. I'd start with a all to the local elevator vendor who might be able to give you as much free education as possible, then I would expect that yes a local professional engineer is in your future.

            Steve
            Steve,

            It has a basement where the machines/electrical circuits for the elevator are currently located. It also has a elevator "house?" on top of the building. So I should be good there. I know some of the new elevators are "machine room free" elevators as they don't require a basement or machine room anymore.

            Would you suggest I call a local engineering/construction company first to get their opinion or will the elevator company have a engineer that comes out to look for the company itself?

            If it's the local engineering/construction company I planned to get them to certify that the 2nd and 3rd floors meet the 125 lbs/sqft requirement and look at the elevator shaft at the same time.

            Thanks for your help.
            Last edited by Okie_Pilot; 3rd November 2016, 11:32 AM.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Robert View Post
              Also, if you have an access control system, plan ahead on if and how you want to integrate it into the elevator. Do you want a keypad inside or outside? Floor Control or Call Button control? Your access system provider would be able to help you with this.
              I haven't planned on integrating access control to the elevator since there are 2 stairways that go up to the floors also. The entire building is dedicated 100% to CC units so I planned on requiring access control to even gain entry into the facility. I figured if they had a unit (or at least had an access code) they belonged there and I could trust them not to pilfer through the other floors for no reason.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Okie_Pilot View Post

                I haven't planned on integrating access control to the elevator since there are 2 stairways that go up to the floors also. The entire building is dedicated 100% to CC units so I planned on requiring access control to even gain entry into the facility. I figured if they had a unit (or at least had an access code) they belonged there and I could trust them not to pilfer through the other floors for no reason.
                Aaaah, don't plan on that. I have seen the stories on here. Plan on the worst case scenario. IMO, I think I would want access control in to the building and on each floor, like a gate code to a ground floor outside unit. It would be a pain but also maybe a different code for building access depending on floor access. Old tenants can try to just get in the building from knowing a building code that does not change.
                "Never let the inmates run the asylum!"

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by pacnwstorage View Post

                  Aaaah, don't plan on that. I have seen the stories on here. Plan on the worst case scenario. IMO, I think I would want access control in to the building and on each floor, like a gate code to a ground floor outside unit. It would be a pain but also maybe a different code for building access depending on floor access. Old tenants can try to just get in the building from knowing a building code that does not change.
                  I guess if one is spending that much money on an elevator, what's a little bit more just to integrate the access control. Better to do it now than later!

                  I planned on integrating the access control with the software. I wanted to provide each tenant with their own key code. I talked to PTI some earlier this year and got a little idea what they could do. I decided that I would like to have a key code that consisted of their unit number first and a 4 digit pin that they picked when they signed the papers. This would be a 7-digit key code and then it would show exactly who entered the facility and when.

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                  • #10
                    Also, just as an aside-when the power goes out, make sure the elevator automatically returns to the ground floor and the door opens. That way you don't get unhappy people stuck inside.
                    An apple a day keeps ANYONE away if you throw it hard enough.

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                    • #11
                      Most also recommend TWO elevators per building in case one is out of order. That is why most who are considering multi-storey will do three floors versus three to make it pay off. I understand that going four or higher takes more restrictive building codes.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Okie_Pilot View Post

                        Would you suggest I call a local engineering/construction company first to get their opinion or will the elevator company have a engineer that comes out to look for the company itself?

                        Thanks for your help.
                        I haven't been involved in elevator installation so I don't have an answer there. I would think that a few calls to any of the above parties is going to help educate you on who you need and in what order. When I have hired engineers for other tasks, they have been willing to give me a summary of the process before the meter starts. Hopefully you could get some basic guidance up front so you have an idea of what you are getting into.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Okie_Pilot View Post

                          I guess if one is spending that much money on an elevator, what's a little bit more just to integrate the access control. Better to do it now than later!

                          I planned on integrating the access control with the software. I wanted to provide each tenant with their own key code. I talked to PTI some earlier this year and got a little idea what they could do. I decided that I would like to have a key code that consisted of their unit number first and a 4 digit pin that they picked when they signed the papers. This would be a 7-digit key code and then it would show exactly who entered the facility and when.
                          Indeed, it's easier to do it now than to have to call the elevator people back later on to run and connect wires. (Think of them hearing a "KA-CHING!" sound in their heads.)

                          And yes, we can set the software up so that only customers with a unit on the upper floors will be able to use the elevator. If you want the customer to have access to any of the floors, you can use a simple "Call Button" control. If you want more restrictive control on exactly which floor they can go to, you'll need to set up for "Floor Control". This may or may not require extra equipment from PTI to do this, depending on how many floors you have. Any of our salespeople will be able to help you out.

                          Robert Toy
                          PTI Security Systems

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                          • #14
                            I am an elevator enthusiast, so I know a little about elevators. For a retrofit, a MRL (machine room less) design might be best (all of the mechanics of the elevator are in the hoistway). Also, for a self storage facility, I would not recommend anything smaller than a hospital size elevator with a capacity of 4000 lbs. or greater.

                            As for fixtures, vandal resistant is the way to go. These are metal buttons as opposed to plastic, and will last significantly longer than standard plastic fixtures. Some of the MRL elevators include the Otis Gen2, The Kone EcoDisc, and I think ThyssenKrupp has one as well. You might want to see if there is an independent contractor in your area that can build you an elevator without proprietary parts so you won't be stuck with one brand's parts.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by inndrcr View Post
                              I am an elevator enthusiast, so I know a little about elevators. For a retrofit, a MRL (machine room less) design might be best (all of the mechanics of the elevator are in the hoistway). Also, for a self storage facility, I would not recommend anything smaller than a hospital size elevator with a capacity of 4000 lbs. or greater.

                              As for fixtures, vandal resistant is the way to go. These are metal buttons as opposed to plastic, and will last significantly longer than standard plastic fixtures. Some of the MRL elevators include the Otis Gen2, The Kone EcoDisc, and I think ThyssenKrupp has one as well. You might want to see if there is an independent contractor in your area that can build you an elevator without proprietary parts so you won't be stuck with one brand's parts.
                              We have Otis. Metal buttons etc. in our elevators-but we have a separate elevator room. When Otis put in our elevators our co. signed a proprietary contract that says only Otis can touch them no matter what. It's a hassle but the repair guys are awesome. We're very fortunate-we have not had any (knocking on wood here) vandalism in any of them.
                              An apple a day keeps ANYONE away if you throw it hard enough.

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