Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 8 of 10
Like Tree3Likes

Thread: On-Site Management help

  1. #1
    2 Amigos is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    4

    Default On-Site Management help

    Hey there. I need some help from the experienced managers here. I will give some general facts about my situation and I will answer any questions that arise.

    We have a highly state of the art, 4 story, 1500+ unit facility that I assist in managing. Current wage is 13.00, live off site about 7 miles away and I pay 1225 (utilities included) at my current 900 sq foot 2-bedroom apartment with a 10x20 garage included.

    Facility has a 1600sq foot apartment that will be available to live in for me in the next few months. Very nice and modern. If I would live there undoubtedly I will put in more hours that aren't paid (making sure things are on the up and up on my days off or after work, making sure all tenants are off the property at closing, etc). I mentioned to the owner that I would not mind living there so in the next few weeks we will be in talks of moving. He has a similar apartment he rents out to a firefighter on-site as well and he charges 1500 for the firefighter and his GF who have no association with the business at all.

    Any thought as to what I should pay for the apartment? Of course it will work to the owners advantage having an employee live on-site, but it would have to benefit me financially as well. Sure I'll be saving a few bucks on gas, but my GF has to backtrack to get to work so the mileage argument would be out. I just have no idea. I was thinking a pay cut of 5 dollars X 160 hours a month avg = 800 plus an additional 200 in cash? What do you think? Facility is in California right by the beach

  2. #2
    Lisa T's Avatar
    Lisa T is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Happy to be in Myrtle Beach, SC!!!
    Posts
    2,850

    Default Re: On-Site Management help

    If you've never lived on site before, there is a HUGE difference between living onsite and living offsite as far as your personal life if you are an employee. I wouldn't pay anything to live onsite, and I've done it twice before and never paid for the apartment or utilities.

    At $13.00 an hour (particularly for California) you aren't making that extravagant amount of money even with a free apartment. I was paid more than that per hours in Florida and Alabama in addition to a free apartment/utilities. That's your choice...but be aware you may be disappointed with the changes in your off hours living offsite, and that disappointment would be magnified with a pay cut.

  3. #3
    FHARumRunner is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Statesville, NC
    Posts
    754

    Default Re: On-Site Management help

    He should offer it free of charge. No cut in pay, period. He is getting more benefit from having you live on site than you would be gaining in the deal.. If he doesn't agree, stay where you are, living on site comes with a lot of additional duties no matter what the owners will say. I have lived on site for seven years and my employer holds it over my head as far as wages are concerned. I'm not sure the "free" is actually that. Customers don't mind ringing the door bell after hours or on my days off, and the owner is just as bad, calling on my days off wanting me to fix this or that he drags in from his home or a friend's house. Don't give in unless you really need the job and it is a condition of employment.
    shaekirk and Gina6k like this.
    The End Is Near!

  4. #4
    Lisa T's Avatar
    Lisa T is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Happy to be in Myrtle Beach, SC!!!
    Posts
    2,850

    Default Re: On-Site Management help

    Rumrunner is correct....and if you take a $5 an hour pay cut, you will be making $8 an hour. Ever try to buy a car or get a credit card with an $8 an hour paycheck stub? Plus, if you ever collect unemployment or social security, it will make a big difference, particularly to the unemployment check amount.

  5. #5
    2 Amigos is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    4

    Default Re: On-Site Management help

    Valid points... I know for a fact the owner would not go for free rent. He will say that that apartment fetches 1600-1800 a month anywhere else so to give it to me for x amount of dollars (im assuming 1,000+) would be giving me a "bargain". I would even like to do it for 1000.00 and save a little bit of fuel and 200 dollars a month but I guess my lack of experience living at work makes me sound crazy.. Haha. I would really love to live here though, it just has to make sense for both the owner and myself.

    Any supporting agruements I could use to pursuade him into reducing the rent to 600-900?

  6. #6
    SMSSId's Avatar
    SMSSId is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    1,021

    Default Re: On-Site Management help

    To live in for a FEW months; How long is a few month? Personally I wouldn’t even consider moving for anything less than a year.
    It’s not uncommon for the onsite managers to put in extra hours; however, you are supposed to get paid for your hours worked. Even salary manager should be receiving OT for extra hours. Apartment and facility site layout or design has a lot to do with getting bombarded from tenants after hours. You can try placing a sign on the apartment door (Business hours 9-5, After hours assistance $35, please pay in cash)

    We worked the CA. inland empire area for several years. In 1998-99 the pay scale was $12 hr. plus med insurance each for husband wife team and a free apartment, utilities paid. Our regular residence (nothing to do with the facility) was a condo near the beach so in essence we had two places. It was a lot easier to stay at the facility during the week and go home on the weekends rather than fight 40/80 miles of traffic daily. Our choice, we liked the beach area better.
    If you and your owners work it right it should work out to be an advantage to both parties. $1225 works out to about a $7.50 hour raise and your adding 700 sq ft to your living area if you get the apt free.
    Onsite apartment can be setup two different ways.
    1) The owner is supplying you an apartment and the rate/fee is modified in exchange of wages. In this situation you and the owner follow the state landlord/tenant guidelines or laws, including eviction and taxes. If you file for unemployment the going apartment rent is suppose to be calculated in as income and taxes paid. IRS might also want their fair share.
    2) The apartment is a condition of employment. Another set of rules come into play. They are kind of like the firefighter you mentioned when he is on the job; he lives at the fire house. This requires a specific contract that spells out the terms, conditions and as a condition of employment. Only pays taxes on $$ received and it is not calculated as employment income or benefits. If your no longer working for the company, notice to vacate can be as little as 24 hours

    Best of luck, only you can decide what work best in your situation.

    PS We still live on location, but with the facility design tenants don't even know were here.

  7. #7
    2 Amigos is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    4

    Default Re: On-Site Management help

    SMSSId thank you for your input. I apologize I was not clear. The 2nd apartment will BE READY in a couple months (still in the process of being built), and after I live there it would be as permanent as I work here.

  8. #8
    Smartgirl's Avatar
    Smartgirl is offline Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Tx, Cali Girl at heart
    Posts
    79

    Default Re: On-Site Management help

    as a term of being a resident manager here, you get a free apartment, internet and utilities. It give your facility and tenants added security knowing that someone is there 24 hrs a day watching over thier goodies. I wouldnt do it if it wasnt free or damn near free
    Youve got to learn to dance before you learn to walk. Ive come to a conclusion, drinking a beer after work leads to a nasty headache in the morning

 

 
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •