Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Stopping condensation

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Stopping condensation

    Hello one and all, I've been searching the internet looking for a solution to condensation inside the units on the ceiling. When the facility was built the engineers said that there was enough air flow for condensation to not be an issue. Fast forward a couple of years and we stopped getting much snow and started getting rain in the winter. Every morning when the humidity is high enough and the temperature low enough, the ceilings start to collect condensation that drips after a bit. Is there anything that we can put on the outside of the units to stop condensation from building up.

    Sorry about formatting, posted on mobile.

  • #2
    Knowing where you're located will be a big help

    Comment


    • #3
      A lot of times there is nothing you can do that will prevent it.

      We offer Chemical Dehumidifiers like Damp Check.

      We recommend the use of pallets which we provide for free at each location. We also tell people not to lean items against metals walls. And recommend covering items in the unit.


      Alternatively a vapor barrier between the ground and the concrete pad helps, but it can't be added later. Also ceiling insulation can help prevent it as well. Wood pole buildings with taller ceilings and less steel also experience less condensation as well.

      But if mother nature presents you with the right weather conditions and a really high dew point the only thing that will help is a completely sealed climate controlled building.

      Comment


      • #4
        Sorry, forgot about that. I'm in the white mountains of Arizona. Mid west in the state. Also these are all metal buildings, Mostly filled. Someone recommended an elastomeric coating, should I try that or bbn is that a waste of time?
        Last edited by Jacobson; 31st January 2020, 06:48 PM.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Jacobson View Post
          Sorry, forgot about that. I'm in the white mountains of Arizona. Mid west in the state. Also these are all metal buildings, Mostly filled. Someone recommended an elastomeric coating, should I try that or bbn is that a waste of time?
          I don't think any kind of coating will prevent all of the problem. But I am not an expert in that area and could be wrong. A coating wont do anything on a day with a really high dew point.

          Comment


          • #6
            Sounds like a mechanical solution in the form of a dehumidifier/vents on the roof that comes on at a certain humidity. Or a large floor model that can be moved around, though you might (probably) need more than one.
            Even duct-tape can't fix stupid. But it can muffle the noises.

            WA State

            Comment


            • #7
              Unless you were to empty the building and spray insulation on the underside of the roof, there isn't much you can do now other than dehumidifiers. A thin vapor barrier under the roof is never a bad idea when you build it. Even in areas that don't usually have condensation issues, it can happen. When I was a building supplier we always tried to get the buyer to add the condensation barrier to prevent the issues like this.
              Terry Campbell
              General Manager - Self-Storage lending division
              Live Oak Bank
              704-437-4322
              [email protected]
              www.liveoakbank.com

              Comment


              • #8
                Do your HVAC units have dampers that let in outside air? It may be worth getting an air balancing company to come out and adjust these. They can do some testing to ensure they are configured right.

                They also may suggest the right time to crack up the heat or cut the units to AC to dry the building out.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Nick_Newk View Post
                  Do your HVAC units have dampers that let in outside air? It may be worth getting an air balancing company to come out and adjust these. They can do some testing to ensure they are configured right.

                  They also may suggest the right time to crack up the heat or cut the units to AC to dry the building out.

                  I kind of assumed when he said he had condensation on his metal ceiling that we were talking about traditional storage and not climate controlled. OP what kind of building are you trying to protect from condensation?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    They are pretty basic units with large roll up doors and steel structure, no HVAC or anything fancy like that. There is also a small gap between the top frame of the door and the roll itself that was thought to be enough ventilation. Also emptying the buildings isn't really an option. Something I tried though was I put some shingles on the metal roof and it did stop condensation in that area.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Insulation on the ceiling would have prevented this. Our buildings have it, but it wasn’t installed correctly on the original buildings when they were built. The end of the insulation wasn’t folded over and then taped to prevent moisture from wicking back into the insulation. That created a problem. So, I cut out the first five feet insulation (to the first roof purlin) and then retrofitted some insulation to that space to prevent dripping from the condensation. I’ve done this for several years and haven’t had any complaints.

                      I bought white bubble insulation and double-sided tape from insulationforless.com. Starting over the door, I attached the tape to the vertical part of the roof purlin and then attached the insulation to the tape, all the way across the width of the unit. (This is temporary, just to hold the insulation for a short time.) The insulation is only 4’ wide so I overlap 3 pieces. (Each piece of insulation is cut long enough to reach the next roof purlin.) Then, I use four self-tapping screws and large washers to permanently attach the insulation to the roof purlin over the door. On the next purlin, five feet into the unit, I attach the double-sided tape again, attach the other end of the insulation, and use the screws/washers to permanently attach it to the roof purlin. There is an air gap between the insulation and the roof, but so far it has worked well.

                      There are a few units where there is no room on the purlins to attach tape, screws, etc., because I’ve run our camera cables inside metal conduit and attached the conduit to the purlins. For these units, I’ve used thin foam board insulation, gluing it directly to the underside of the roof with construction adhesive. I’ve only done this to a couple of units about 10 months ago. It seems to be working so far. The difficult part is holding the board up until the adhesive takes hold. The adhesive (and it takes a lot) also eats into the foam. So when you’re done, you’ll see it from underneath. You’ll need to use the board that has a foil face since the adhesive will eat the foam in spots. Not as pretty as the bubble insulation, but was a good solution for those units.

                      Maybe something like this will work for you. I would like to find some type of insulation-type paint that can be painted onto the underside of the roof.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        That sounds like It would work fine for any unit I can get in, but I only have a couple of units open atm. Asking people to come and open their uni yt s however isn't quite so realistic,.I have some tenants that live 400+ miles away, and I can't just wait for them to clear out one by one because I have some who have been here for more than a decade. Unless there is some way I could put something like that up through the door gap then it just isn't feasible. Hope all these ideas help someone else though.

                        Comment

                        Latest Topics

                        Collapse

                        Working...
                        X