Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Standing Seam Roofs

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Standing Seam Roofs

    Our latest location we decided to do Standing Seam roofs, versus screw down. Costs a little more, but will last longer with less leaks and need for future (15 to 25 years) checking on loose screws.

    Now I did not and am not giving a definitive answer on which is best and etc. My local distributor and prior contractor had both mentioned and recommended it, so decided to try it.

    Comparison:
    Cost wise, I don't have the difference.
    Screw down replacement, if you did have to tighten or replace screws on the Screw down system, just get larger screws so they seal better and replace.
    Erection time. Standing Seam takes extra time to place and set the hidden clamps. Every 5 feet, so not a lot of time. But you do a lot less screws overall.

    Picture below is of a normal screw down system. You will have screws all along the ridges and all across the sheet every 5 feet. These two Lips of the two different sheets show them not matching, which could lead to leakage.

    rr rf1.JPG


    Next picture shows the Standing Seam roof. The metal clip is screwed in place. This side of the sheet is clipped under the clip, then the next sheet will be laid on top and the two edges will be snapped into place. Invert your hands to each other. Then curl your fingers. Pull your curled fingers together and that is how the sheets are connected. The top sheet has glue on it, which gives an air and water tight sill to them. These also set about 3 inches above the "trough" or valley of the sheet, whereas "Screw down" method is about an inch high. Creates less chance for water or ice to come under the seams.



    rr rf 3.JPG

    Next is the clip itself from front and back. The back side shows you the screw holes attached to the trusses. This is hidden under the roof. This clip is set in the ridge where the two sheets meet and are then pushed or snapped down to each other and this clip.
    rr rf 4.JPG rr rf 5.JPG

    Next, I'm showing you the width of the valleys on the 'Standing Seam roof". Normal Screw down roof valleys are about a foot wide and this is about 2 foot wide, using my fore arm as a gauge. Can't wait to see how this helps with snow melting or blowing off the roof, compared to the narrower screw down valleys.


    rr rf 6.JPG

    Again which is better? Don't know the answer. "Standing Seam" costs more, but I don't have the figures for you. Should last longer (30 to 50 years) with less leakage problems. All my other buildings are "Screw Down" and no leakage problems thus far (1 to 6 years). I do have a "Screw Down" building we bought the location, that is around 20 years old. We are having leaks and we will have to take the screws off and replace with larger screws (so they "bite" the existing screw hole) this summer.

    Attached Files

  • #2
    Our company went with the seam roofs for all 4 locations a couple years ago. They got tired of dealing with leaks and repairs. They put them over the previous roofs for double protection and paid around 1 mil to do all locations but totally worth it. These days when someone thinks their unit is leaking, I will still go take a look just to reassure them and usually it's due to the floors sweating (we have about 5 NC units that do this in the same area) or something of theirs leaking. After I see that, I reassure them again about the replacement roofs and how they are doubled and they feel a lot better. Totally worth the cost to avoid the headache and heartbreak of leaky roofs.

    Comment


    • #3
      We had a standing seam roof in San Diego-after 7 years we were having leaks because the grommet thingy that the screw screws into broke down. We had to caulk a bunch of them. Make sure the (flexible washer? not sure what it's called) will hold up. San Diego has it's sunny reputation, and it's heck on stuff like that.
      "Carpe the HECK out of this diem."
      WA state

      Comment


      • #4
        AngelaESSTX
        KrisinWA

        Its either who has the worst weather extremes for this application, East Texas or San Diego?
        Or these are two different applications (one over existing roof) with two different results.

        Anyone out there have snow and ice on theirs. Really curious since that is an issue for me. Since the ridges are higher this will either create more of a problem since more snow will build up; or it will be less of a problem since the valleys are wider and will melt and run off quicker.

        Thanks for all input.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Clarkstoragellc View Post
          AngelaESSTX
          KrisinWA

          Its either who has the worst weather extremes for this application, East Texas or San Diego?
          Or these are two different applications (one over existing roof) with two different results.

          Anyone out there have snow and ice on theirs. Really curious since that is an issue for me. Since the ridges are higher this will either create more of a problem since more snow will build up; or it will be less of a problem since the valleys are wider and will melt and run off quicker.

          Thanks for all input.
          New build/roof for us, but yeah, it will be interesting to see the snow and freeze and thaw and how it holds up for you.
          "Carpe the HECK out of this diem."
          WA state

          Comment


          • #6
            Attached is an end shot of the standing seam roof for comparison.
            rr rf9.JPG
            Attached Files

            Comment


            • #7
              Unless you are in an area that gets almost no rain, Standing seam is the way to go. I won't say that you should put it everywhere, but some areas get only 3 to 4 inches of rain a year, but I will say that you should use it in MOST areas. There are different kinds and designs of standing seam roofs, so the photos above are representative of one of the most widely used types. A screw-down roof gives you so many opportunities for leaks....each screw penetrates the roof panel and goes right into the building. It isn't really IF the roof will leak, but WHEN will it leak. The sun deteriorates the washers, but you also have expansion and contraction from the heating and cooling which will cause the screw hole to enlarge because the screw doesn't move. Using a screw-down on a pitched roof is more acceptable because the water runs off so fast, it doesn't have much of a chance to leak. The standing seam is an insurance policy to protect your customer's goods and your reputation in your market. Also, remember, that either roof is only as good as the installer.
              Terry Campbell
              General Manager - Self-Storage lending division
              Live Oak Bank
              704-437-4322
              [email protected]
              www.liveoakbank.com

              Comment


              • #8
                Is there something on the bottom half to prevent wind from getting under and turning it into a parachute?

                Comment


                • #9
                  The concealed clips hold it down except at the eaves and this is where you have to screw through the pan into the structure below.
                  Terry Campbell
                  General Manager - Self-Storage lending division
                  Live Oak Bank
                  704-437-4322
                  [email protected]
                  www.liveoakbank.com

                  Comment

                  Latest Topics

                  Collapse

                  Working...
                  X