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Beetle Larva - dead in units

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  • Beetle Larva - dead in units

    We just found a few units with these dead bugs , I took a sample to the exterminator and they said they were beetle larva . Itís been -30 and just went above zero . I donít know where these beetles came from as they are spread from 2 different buildings . Some of these were found attached to the drywall dead . Has anyone encountered this ? Iím wondering if maybe when we swept one unit and didnít see them ( they are tiny ) and went and swept another unit if we actually transported the eggs or larva to the next unit . Ugh

  • #2
    What did the exterminator say about where they come from and how they can spread? You did ask, right?
    "Never let the inmates run the asylum!"

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    • #3
      Originally posted by pacnwstorage View Post
      What did the exterminator say about where they come from and how they can spread? You did ask, right?
      Yes I did ask . They said they probably came in boxes or something , they werenít too helpful . They gave me those stickie boxes and said if they thrived they would eventually show up on these strips . I will ha e to mark that entire area as unrentable

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      • #4
        A suggestion, if you have a powerful "shop vac" vacuum, to suck up these units and the units around them. That way you can dump the larvae in the trash and away from the possibility of spreading them. I did this in my old facility and it made cleanups a breeze. Picked up the big chunks, vacuumed up the dust, bugs, glitter, etc. Made it easy to keep the property very clean. My property had an electric socket every 50 ft so a 50' extension cord was all I needed.
        Tall Terri

        The customer's fantasy doesn't always match with reality!

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        • #5
          I use a very powerful battery powered blower to blow the entire unit out, or my maint man does, instead of sweeping. Very spotless unit after all this. The maint man will blow the drives as well. Before I do this I go thru and pick up anything I don't want blown out to the drives.
          "Never let the inmates run the asylum!"

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Tall Terri View Post
            A suggestion, if you have a powerful "shop vac" vacuum, to suck up these units and the units around them. That way you can dump the larvae in the trash and away from the possibility of spreading them. I did this in my old facility and it made cleanups a breeze. Picked up the big chunks, vacuumed up the dust, bugs, glitter, etc. Made it easy to keep the property very clean. My property had an electric socket every 50 ft so a 50' extension cord was all I needed.
            Dewalt also makes a portable shop vac that takes batteries and has a cord on it. I bought one for here because it uses the same battery as my drill and grinder. I have no electrical outlets except for my office. I use the little vacuum for all the nooks and crannies in the units that brooms don't quite reach.
            A lack of planning on your part does not constitute an emergency on mine.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by pacnwstorage View Post
              I use a very powerful battery powered blower to blow the entire unit out, or my maint man does, instead of sweeping. Very spotless unit after all this. The maint man will blow the drives as well. Before I do this I go thru and pick up anything I don't want blown out to the drives.
              My problem with blowing out the unit is just blowing the product that could be bug eggs into another unit. If you vacuum them and dispose of them, then they are in the trash bag, semi-sealed up and gone.
              Tall Terri

              The customer's fantasy doesn't always match with reality!

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              • #8
                Look up carpet beetles and their larvae. See if it's a match, and if so you'll need to get an experienced exterminator. Either way you'll need to spray in front of units and in your empty units in that area.
                90% of what you're stressing about now won't even be relevant in a year. Breathe easy. ~Wesley Snipes

                WA State

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                • #9
                  I think they came from external factors too like storage boxes of renters or their other personal belongings. Since they are tiny, they could spread like wildfire once the temperatures start to rise to their liking. Comb through the affected units and place an insecticide or anything like that to prevent a massive outbreak once the new season sets in.

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