Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

New Operator: Door Maintenance Question

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • New Operator: Door Maintenance Question

    Hi,

    First time owner/operator and I am noticing that some of the latches are hard to slide open/close. I have replaced the latches and I have the same issue but I noticed if I apply some downward pressure on the door either from the latch or by stepping on the door handle the latch slides freely. Are the springs pulling the door up with too much force? Is this typical?

    Thanks!

  • #2
    Yes very typical. Just explain or show the customer during the move in process. If you don't you will be getting calls that the door is broke.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by evets View Post
      Yes very typical. Just explain or show the customer during the move in process. If you don't you will be getting calls that the door is broke.
      Exactly my issue. People are having trouble with the latch and I need to demonstrate so I was wondering if it was typical or a spring issue as I am new to this. I guess I will include a note in the welcome email. Thanks

      Comment


      • #4
        It's pretty typical. We just advise tenants to step on the handle while sliding the hasp over.

        Comment


        • #5
          If it really bothers you, get a large vice grip and clamp it to the upper part of the door track hole. You can clamp on and then bend back and forth and it will break off. I would normally clamp about a 1/4 inch at a time until the latch will slide over without stepping on the door.
          Joe Krezdorn
          DAK Self Storage
          Leesport, PA 19533
          www.dakselfstorage.com

          Comment


          • #6
            It is normal because of the spring assist, the rope coming out under the door edge and the seal at the bottom being harder at times than other times and have to step on the handle to compress. You also need to make sure when showing the unit before rental, how to step on the handle and why it needs to be done sometimes. The other thing you will run in to is the build up of crud at the bottom of the rails, on each side, that keeps the door from sliding all the way down. I use a wide blade flat screwdriver to dig this all out and sweep away when getting unit ready for a new tenant. When I am out doing rounds I stop at open units and do that for tenants when they have a unit open and also remind them to do it themselves periodically. They appreciate it and then take possession of doing it themselves to feel engaged in the process.


            I have also told prospective tenants that the tight latch slide means a tight seal at the bottom of the door.

            By the way, welcome to the forum from Oregon
            Last edited by pacnwstorage; 17 March 2021, 01:27 PM.

            Comment


            • #7
              Yep, you have to step on the handle to get that extra oomph to slide the hasp into the door frame.
              "The comeback is always stronger than the setback."
              Mom, Navy Vet, genealogist and voracious reader
              WA state

              Comment


              • #8
                yep, I can't tell you how many times I've said "step and slide" over the years.

                Probably just a tad fewer than as many times as I've said "sure, I'd be happy to eat the rest of that".

                What bothers me is the silly engineer that designed the latch holes to line up when the latch is in the full open position. Why they couldn't stagger the holes so you could ONLY lock it when property closed is a mystery. Seems every month I'm finding customers that locked their units in the open position, probably due to becoming frustrated that they couldn't get the the latch to slide closed, so they just put the lock on in the open holes and leave.

                Extremely poor design, and seems like latch design 101.


                In no way affiliated with Storman software.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Storman View Post
                  yep, I can't tell you how many times I've said "step and slide" over the years.

                  Probably just a tad fewer than as many times as I've said "sure, I'd be happy to eat the rest of that".

                  What bothers me is the silly engineer that designed the latch holes to line up when the latch is in the full open position. Why they couldn't stagger the holes so you could ONLY lock it when property closed is a mystery. Seems every month I'm finding customers that locked their units in the open position, probably due to becoming frustrated that they couldn't get the the latch to slide closed, so they just put the lock on in the open holes and leave.

                  Extremely poor design, and seems like latch design 101.

                  Lord yes, every week maintenance goes around and finds units locked open. I get usually get a 'It was my wife, or it was my husband.' Passing the buck, a time honored marriage tradition.
                  "The comeback is always stronger than the setback."
                  Mom, Navy Vet, genealogist and voracious reader
                  WA state

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by dakselfstorage View Post
                    If it really bothers you, get a large vice grip and clamp it to the upper part of the door track hole. You can clamp on and then bend back and forth and it will break off. I would normally clamp about a 1/4 inch at a time until the latch will slide over without stepping on the door.
                    Yes I use a hand hack saw blade to cut both sides then bend off It can be the top of the slot or the bottom check that out first

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I knew this could be a problem as soon as I took over here and right then I started telling new tenants about making sure the unit is locked correctly and I showed them an example as I showed them the unit. I literally told/showed every new tenant but still I had the problem of someone else locking the unit wrong at times. I was averaging about 12-15 units a month. I then came up with an idea. I printed a sign that says, "Did you remember to lock your unit correctly"? I had it laminated and then attached it just below the keypad itself to a spot where I could mount it at the exit podium. I watched as people then started to come up and read the sign and then put their vehicle in reverse and go check their unit lock. I now average 1 a month that lock the unit wrong.

                      When I am showing the tenant at the unit what I mean, I have the latch completely opened and you can see three holes for the lock to attach at. I then say this, "Three holes means free stuff". I then slide the latch over and show them 2 holes. I then say "Two holes means locked correctly". It is inane and boring but it gets the point across. Gotta remember that a lot of the time we are not dealing with rocket scientists when renting units.

                      I warn people all the time that the things I say during a unit showing and lease process are because of the Farmer's Insurance commercial where at the end the guy says, "We know a thing or two because we have seen a thing or two"!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by pacnwstorage View Post
                        I knew this could be a problem as soon as I took over here and right then I started telling new tenants about making sure the unit is locked correctly and I showed them an example as I showed them the unit. I literally told/showed every new tenant but still I had the problem of someone else locking the unit wrong at times. I was averaging about 12-15 units a month. I then came up with an idea. I printed a sign that says, "Did you remember to lock your unit correctly"? I had it laminated and then attached it just below the keypad itself to a spot where I could mount it at the exit podium. I watched as people then started to come up and read the sign and then put their vehicle in reverse and go check their unit lock. I now average 1 a month that lock the unit wrong.

                        When I am showing the tenant at the unit what I mean, I have the latch completely opened and you can see three holes for the lock to attach at. I then say this, "Three holes means free stuff". I then slide the latch over and show them 2 holes. I then say "Two holes means locked correctly". It is inane and boring but it gets the point across. Gotta remember that a lot of the time we are not dealing with rocket scientists when renting units.

                        I warn people all the time that the things I say during a unit showing and lease process are because of the Farmer's Insurance commercial where at the end the guy says, "We know a thing or two because we have seen a thing or two"!
                        What a great idea!! I'm going to make some and put them in the elevator!
                        "The comeback is always stronger than the setback."
                        Mom, Navy Vet, genealogist and voracious reader
                        WA state

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          If I had the room the sign would also say something like: "Save a second trip back to facility and"...............

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Very normal especially when the doors are new and the rubber seal at the bottom is holding its shape better. Over time the rubber seal gets more compressed against the concrete and the latches begin to slide easier.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Mine would be more the bubble weatherstripping than the spring. As mentioned before, make sure the track area is clear of debris and any rope is not sticking out of the unit (especially the knot for a handle) along the concrete where the weatherstripping makes the seal.
                              I adjust my springs so the door does not rise (go up) or fall (go down) but remains balanced and provides enough help so the door is generally easy to lift and close.
                              When I replace the old, dry-rotted seal, I do have to use a battery hacksaw to adjust the opening for the latch, so it will close, by cutting up either side of the opening. I do not remove the cut metal, but just bend it, in case I have to make adjustments.
                              With the latch, you just want to make sure you include the spacers during the install. This will help keep the latch from binding when it slides. I use duct tape to hold the bolts in place when I place the latch on the door, then slip inside the unit to put the backing bar and nuts on the bolt ends. Then attach the foam over the backing bar (metal plate) and nuts. I have had to adjust the door stop on the latch side a number of times on units, by adding washers, so that the foam is not torn off or damaged by the door stop.

                              I saw a tenant pull out a hammer one-time to bang the latch over, since he could not open the latch. I showed him how to open by putting pressure on the handle and if he needed a little more, where he could grab on the column between to the units.

                              Comment

                              Latest Topics

                              Collapse

                              Working...
                              X